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SLAS2019 Short Courses

Gene Editing for Drug Discovery

Genome editing tools such as CRISPR-Cas9 are reshaping what is possible within the biological sciences. This course will introduce the possibilities of what can be achieved with genome editing, the current limitations, and the fundamentals of how to apply these technologies to enhance the pursuit of targets and therapeutics.

Who Should Attend:

  • Assay and HTS biologists
  • Those interested in drug discovery technology
  • Scientists working on functional genomics
  • Those wanting to learn the basics of CRISPR/Cas9 technology and how it can be practically applied

How You Will Benefit From This Course:

  • Up-to-date information on what works and what doesn't
  • Workflows for typical experiments
  • Case studies

Course Topics:

  • Genome engineering
  • Gene editing: Knockouts and knockins
  • CRISPR-Cas9
  • Functional genomics
  • Genetic screens

Instructors:

Scott T. Younger

Scott T. Younger
Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard

Scott Younger is a Research Scientist in the Genetic Perturbation Platform at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard. In his current role, he consults and assists research groups interested in performing genome-scale genetic screens using CRISPR/Cas9. In addition, he is developing new methodologies that will further expand the utility of CRISPR-based approaches. Younger joined the Broad Institute in 2016 after having completed his postdoctoral studies at Harvard University as an American Cancer Society Fellow. He holds a Ph.D. in cell and molecular biology from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. He also received an M.S. in biotechnology from the University of Texas at San Antonio and a B.S.I. in bioinformatics from Baylor University.

Samuel A. Hasson

Samuel A. Hasson
Amgen

Sam Hasson is a Senior Scientist and lab head in Amgen Neuroscience (Cambridge, Massachusetts). His lab focuses on the deconvolution of human genetics for novel target selection and employs genome editing technologies to enable this process. A major goal of his work is to identify modulators of complex neuroimmune phenotypes utilizing innovative assay design strategies such as high content screening. Prior to joining Amgen Neuroscience in 2018, Sam led a group in Pfizer Neuroscience. As a postdoc, Sam trained with Richard Youle and Jim Inglese at the National Institutes of Health.


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